Long-term survival and preprocedural predictors of mortality in high surgical risk patients undergoing percutaneous mitral valve repair

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Abstract

Objectives:

To evaluate long-term survival in high surgical risk patients undergoing percutaneous mitral valve repair (MVR) using the MitraClip® system and to identify preprocedural predictors of long-term mortality.

Background:

Data for long-term survival and preprocedural predictors of mortality after percutaneous MVR in high surgical risk patients are sporadic.

Methods:

From January 2009 to April 2013, 136 consecutive high surgical risk patients, with symptomatic moderate-to-severe or severe mitral regurgitation (MR), underwent percutaneous MVR using the MitraClip system. Cardiac and overall survival was determined at one and 2 years postprocedure. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed to identify preprocedural predictors of long-term mortality.

Results:

One year postprocedure, cardiac and overall survival was 86.7% and 84.6%, respectively and at 2 years cardiac and overall survival was 77.7% and 74.8%, respectively. In univariate analysis advanced age, lower body mass index, impaired renal function, elevated levels of log-N-terminal-pro-brain-natriuretic-peptide (log-NTproBNP), poor performance in functional tests (New York Heart Association (NYHA) class) and high logistic Euroscore (LES) and Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score were identified as preprocedural predictors of long-term cardiac mortality. In multivariate analysis preoperative NYHA class III and IV, elevated levels of log-NTproBNP and advanced age predicted long-term cardiac mortality.

Conclusions:

Percutaneous MVR using the MitraClip system has favorable long-term survival rates in high surgical risk patients. Preprocedural NYHA functional class III and IV, elevated log-NTproBNP levels and advanced age predict higher long-term cardiac mortality and should be considered during patient selection. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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