Markers of Angiogenesis and Clinical Features in Patients With Sarcoma

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Abstract

The growth and dissemination of sarcomas depends on angiogenesis. A number of measurable markers related to tumor angiogenesis have been studied in patients with sarcoma.

The available literature related to markers of angiogenesis and clinical features in patients with sarcoma was reviewed. Clinical features of interest included tumor size, tumor grade, tumor stage, presence of metastatic disease, and prognosis. In patients with soft-tissue sarcomas, tumor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression correlates with stage, grade, and prognosis. Circulating VEGF levels also correlate with tumor grade. High circulating angiopoietin-2 levels are associated with increased tumor size in soft-tissue sarcoma. For patients with osteosarcoma, tumor VEGF expression correlates with outcome. Elevated tumor and circulating VEGF levels are associated with the development of lung metastases in osteosarcoma. Patients with Ewing sarcoma have increased circulating VEGF levels compared with controls. Angiogenesis markers correlate with important clinical features in patients with sarcomas ranging from soft-tissue sarcomas to bone sarcomas. Markers of angiogenesis may serve an important role in predicting a particular patient's clinical course and in identifying patients for possible antiangiogenic therapy.

A number of measurable markers related to tumor angiogenesis have been studied in patients with sarcoma. Many of these studies demonstrate an association between tumor angiogenesis and clinical features in patients with sarcoma, including tumor size, tumor stage, and prognosis.

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