Effect of sex on left ventricular pump function in patients with anterior wall myocardial infarction treated with primary angioplasty

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Background

The prognosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is distinctly worse in postmenopausal women than in age-matched men. Unstable angina before AMI is reported to protect left ventricular pump function during the left ventricular remodeling process in patients who have undergone successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). We postulate that left ventricular pump function may be different in postmenopausal women and age-matched men with unstable angina before AMI and successful PTCA.

Methods

Twenty-three postmenopausal women (aged 63 ± 7 years) and 31 age-matched men (aged 65 ± 6 years) with unstable angina before AMI and successful PTCA were investigated using radionuclide angiography in the late hospital phase.

Results

Global ejection fraction (EF), regional EF of the non-infarcted area, and the ratio of systemic arterial systolic blood pressure to left ventricular end-systolic volume (P:V ratio) were lower in women compared with those in men. Global EF, regional EF of the non-infarcted area, and the P:V ratio in women with left ventricular end-diastolic volume (EDV) ≥ 140ml were significantly lower than in those with a left ventricular EDV of less than 140 ml, but no significant differences were noted in these indexes with regard to left ventricular EDV in men.

Conclusion

Sex may play an important role in the left ventricular remodeling process in postmenopausal women, especially those with a dilated left ventricle.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles