Usefulness of the SYNTAX score II to predict 1-year outcome in patients with primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Objective

This study aimed to investigate the predictive effect of SYNTAX score II (SS-II) for the 1-year outcome in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing a primary percutaneous coronary intervention and whether SS-II improves the ability of anatomical and Logistic Clinical SYNTAX score and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events to predict major adverse cardiac events (MACE).

Background

SS-II can predict 1-year outcomes in patients with complex coronary artery disease. However, the prognostic value of SS-II for patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention remains unclear.

Materials and methods

A total of 477 patients were divided into three groups on the basis of SS-II [SS-II low tertile <20 (n=161), 20 ≤SS-II intermediate tertile ≤26 (n=145), and SS-II high tertile >26 (n=171)]. Kaplan–Meier methods were used to compare the MACE at the 1-year follow-up.

Results

MACE was highest in the SS-II high tertile (21.1 vs. 10.3 vs. 5.5%, P<0.001), including all-cause mortality (11.7 vs. 4.1 vs. 2.5%, P=0.001), target vessel revascularization (7.6 vs. 4.1 vs. 1.8%, P=0.037), and recurrent MI (5.8 vs. 2.1 vs. 1.2%, P=0.035), compared with SS-II intermediate and low tertiles. In Cox multivariable analysis, SS-II was an independent predictor for MACE at 1 year. The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that SS-II had 60% sensitivity and 78% specificity for predicting 1-year MACE as a cut-off value of 27.5. The respective C-statistics of SS-II, anatomical, and Logistic Clinical SYNTAX score and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events for MACE were 0.726, 0.587, 0.684, and 0.628 (P<0.05).

Conclusion

SS-II can predict 1-year clinical outcomes in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and has an improved ability to predict MACE.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles