Frequency and Risk Factors for Cerebral Arterial Disease in a HIV/AIDS Neuroimaging Cohort

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Abstract

Background:

Infection with HIV predisposes patients to a myriad of neurologic disorders, including cerebrovascular disease. The pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, with proposed mechanisms including infectious vasculitis, HIV-induced endothelial dysfunction and adverse effects of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Epidemiologic data on clinically evident cerebral vasculopathy in HIV-infected adults is scarce, even though stroke hospitalizations are rising in this patient population.

Methods:

A total of 6,298 HIV-infected adults (San Francisco General Hospital, 2000-2013) were screened to generate a cohort of patients with dedicated neuroimaging of the intra- and extracranial cerebral vasculature. We extracted information regarding the extent of HIV disease (including serial viral load and CD4 counts), cardiovascular disease risk factors and exposure to cART (cross-referenced with pharmacy records) and performed multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify predictors of vasculopathy.

Results:

Of 144 patients, 55 patients (38.2%) had radiographic evidence of cerebral vasculopathy. Twenty (13.9%) had a vasculopathy characterized by vessel dolichoectasia and intracranial aneurysm formation. Thirty-five patients (24.3%) had intra- and or extracranial stenosis/occlusion. cART use (OR 2.27, 95% CI 1.03-5) and tobacco abuse (OR 2.35, 95% CI 1.04-5.25) were independently associated with the development of any vasculopathy, whereas cART use was also an independent risk factor for the stenosis/occlusion subtype specifically (OR 2.87, 95% CI 1.11-7.45).

Conclusions:

There was a high frequency of cerebral arterial disease in this neuroimaging cohort of HIV/AIDS patients. A history of cART use and a history of tobacco abuse were independent risk factors for vasculopathy, though these findings should be confirmed with large-scale prospective studies.

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