Invasive Breast Cancer Preferably and Predominantly Occurs at the Interface Between Fibroglandular and Adipose Tissue

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Abstract

Micro-Abstract

The position of invasive breast tumor in relation to fibroglandular and adipose tissue was assessed in this retrospective dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging investigation of 294 patients. These tumors were found to occur predominantly at the interface between fibroglandular and adipose tissue.

Background:

Increasing evidence suggests adipocyte involvement in malignant breast tumor invasive front or margin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the location of invasive breast tumors in relation to fibroglandular and adipose tissue by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI).

Patients and Methods:

Pretreatment breast DCE-MRI images of 294 patients with biopsy-proven invasive breast cancer from 2008 to 2014 were studied. Invasive breast tumors were visualized as enhanced lesions in the postcontrast subtraction images. Positive identification of biopsy-confirmed invasive breast tumors on DCE-MRI images was achieved by correlation of findings from breast MRI and pathology reports. Tumor location in relation to fibroglandular and adipose tissue was investigated using precontrast T1-weighted MRI images.

Results:

Of 294 patients, 291 had DCE-MRI discernable invasive breast tumors located at the interface between fibroglandular and adipose tissues, regardless of the tumor size, type, receptor status, or breast composition.

Conclusion:

Invasive breast cancer preferably and predominantly occurs adjacent to breast adipose tissue.

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