Reducing Acute Kidney Injury Due to Contrast Material: How Nurses Can Improve Patient Safety

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Background

Acute kidney injury due to contrast material occurs in 3% to 15% of the 2 million cardiac catheterizations done in the United States each year.

Objective

To reduce acute kidney injury due to contrast material after cardiovascular interventional procedures.

Methods

Nurse leaders in the Northern New England Cardiovascular Disease Study Group, a 10-center quality improvement consortium in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont, formed a nursing task force to reduce acute kidney injury due to contrast material after cardiovascular interventional procedures. Data were prospectively collected January 1, 2007, through June 30, 2012, on consecutive nonemergent patients (n = 20 147) undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions.

Results

Compared with baseline rates, adjusted rates of acute kidney injury among the 10 centers were significantly reduced by 21% and by 28% in patients with baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2. Key qualitative system factors associated with improvement included use of multidisciplinary teams, standardized fluid orders, use of an intravenous fluid bolus, patient education about oral hydration, and limiting the volume of contrast material.

Conclusions

Standardization of evidence-based best practices in nursing care may reduce the incidence of acute kidney injury due to contrast material.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles