Reducing Use of Restraints in Intensive Care Units: A Quality Improvement Project

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Use of physical restrainst is scrutinized in intensive care units today. Usage rates for the 5 intensive care units in the Christiana Care Health Services, Newark, Delaware, were higher than the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators mean rate of 9.61% to 15.43% for many months during fiscal years 2013 and 2014.

OBJECTIVE

To reduce and sustain the restraint rates to less than the national database mean rates for all 5 intensive care units.

METHODS

A quality improvement process was used that included forming a multiunit restraint collaborative; reviewing restraint data, including self-extubation rates; surveying staff nurses to examine alignment with evidence-based practice; and selecting a new restraint-alternative product.

RESULTS

All 5 intensive care units were able to successfully decrease restraint rates to less than the national database mean for the majority of the months since the start of the restraint collaborative in September 2012.

CONCLUSION

Use of a restraint collaborative with subsequent adoption of restraint alternatives led to a decrease in restraint rates for the 5 intensive care units to less than the national database mean, enabled sustained success, and helped align nurses' beliefs with evidence-based practice.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles