Abstract 136: The Relationship of Changing Hospital Readmission Rates and Mortality Rates After Hospitalization for Heart Failure, Acute Myocardial Infarction, and Pneumonia

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Abstract

Background: It is unknown if financial pressures to reduce hospital readmission rates following passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) have had the unintended effect of increasing mortality rates after hospitalization. We therefore examined correlations between paired changes in hospital 30-day readmission rates and 30-day mortality rates among Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries hospitalized with heart failure (HF), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), or pneumonia from 2008 to 2014.

Methods: We used linear regression to calculate monthly changes in hospitals’ 30-day risk-adjusted readmission rates (RARRs) and 30-day risk-adjusted mortality rates (RAMRs) after discharge for HF, AMI, and pneumonia from 2008 to 2014. Adjustment was made for patient age, sex, comorbidities, hospital length of stay, and season. We then examined the correlation of hospitals’ paired monthly changes in 30-day RARRs and monthly changes in 30-day RAMRs after discharge.

Results: From 2008 to 2014, we identified 2,962,554, 1,229,939, and 2,544,530 hospitalizations for HF, AMI, and pneumonia at 5,016, 4,772, and 5,057 hospitals, respectively. Hospital 30-day RARRs declined for all three conditions from 2008 to 2014; the monthly change in RARRs was -0.053 (95% CI -0.055, -0.051) for HF, -0.044 (95% CI -0.047, -0.041) for AMI, and -0.033 (95% CI -0.035, -0.031) for pneumonia. In contrast, the monthly change in hospital 30-day RAMRs after discharge varied by admitting condition and was 0.008 (95% CI 0.007, 0.010) for HF, -0.003 (95% CI -0.006, -0.001) for AMI, and 0.001 (95% CI -0.001, 0.003) for pneumonia. The correlation between monthly changes in hospitals’ 30-day RARRs and 30-day RAMRs after discharge was 0.060 for HF (p<0.001), 0.059 for AMI (p=0.003), and 0.106 for pneumonia (p<0.001). Representative data showing the poor correlation in hospitals’ paired monthly changes in 30-day RARRs and 30-day RAMRs for AMI is shown in the Figure.

Conclusion: Changes in hospital readmission rates for HF, AMI, and pneumonia were poorly correlated with changes in mortality rates after hospitalization between 2008 and 2014. These findings suggest that financial incentives to improve hospitals’ readmission performance have not increased mortality after hospitalization.

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