Ethnic Differences in Prevalence of Post-stroke Depression

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Abstract

Background:

Little is known about ethnic differences in poststroke depression (PSD) in the United States. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of PSD at 90 days after first-ever stroke and to examine ethnic differences in the prevalence between Mexican Americans (MAs) and non-Hispanic whites (NHWs).

Methods and Results:

Stroke cases from 2011 to 2015 were identified from the BASIC project (Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi)—a population-based stroke surveillance study in south Texas. Participants were interviewed at the onset of stroke (baseline interview) and ≈90 days post-stroke (outcome interview). PSD was assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-8. Inverse probability weights were generated to account for differential attrition, and weighted logistic regression was used to investigate the association between ethnicity and PSD. The study sample consisted of 586 first-ever stroke patients who completed nonproxy baseline and outcome interviews and had depression assessment. Approximately, 60% of them were MAs, and 40% were NHWs. After accounting for attrition, the prevalence of depression at 90 days post-stroke was 30.4% for MAs (95% confidence interval, 25.0%–35.9%) and 20.7% for NHWs (95% confidence interval, 15.7%–25.7%). The crude odds of PSD in MAs was 1.69 times greater than that in NHWs (95% confidence interval, 1.13–2.51). The odds ratio decreased by 23.6% after adjustment for education (odds ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 0.82–2.02) and was further attenuated with additional adjustment for other covariates.

Conclusions:

MAs had a higher prevalence of PSD at 90 days than NHWs. The ethnic difference was explained by sociodemographic and health factors, especially low educational attainment.

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