No Perinatal HIV-1 Transmission From Women With Effective Antiretroviral Therapy Starting Before Conception

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Abstract

Background. The efficacy of preventing perinatal transmission (PT) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) depends on both viral load (VL) and treatment duration. The objective of this study was to determine whether initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) before conception has the potential to eliminate PT.

Methods. A total of 8075 HIV-infected mother/infant pairs included from 2000 to 2011 in the national prospective multicenter French Perinatal Cohort (ANRS-EPF) received ART, delivered live-born children with determined HIV infection status, and did not breastfeed. PT was analyzed according to maternal VL at delivery and timing of ART initiation.

Results. The overall rate of PT was 0.7% (56 of 8075). No transmission occurred among 2651 infants born to women who were receiving ART before conception, continued ART throughout the pregnancy, and delivered with a plasma VL <50 copies/mL (upper 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1%). VL and timing of ART initiation were independently associated with PT in logistic regression. Regardless of VL, the PT rate increased from 0.2% (6 of 3505) for women starting ART before conception to 0.4% (3 of 709), 0.9% (24 of 2810), and 2.2% (23 of 1051) for those starting during the first, second, or third trimester (P < .001). Regardless of when ART was initiated, the PT rate was higher for women with VLs of 50–400 copies/mL near delivery than for those with <50 copies/mL (adjusted odds ratio, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.9–8.2).

Conclusions. Perinatal HIV-1 transmission is virtually zero in mothers who start ART before conception and maintain suppression of plasma VL.

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