Effects of modified sit-to-stand training on balance control in hemiplegic stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial

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Abstract

Objective:

To explore the effectiveness of modified sit-to-stand training on balance function in hemiplegic stroke patients.

Design:

Randomized controlled trial.

Setting:

Rehabilitation medical centre.

Participants:

A total of 50 hemiplegic patients with stroke were randomly assigned to the control and experimental groups (n = 25 for each group).

Interventions:

Patients in the control group received the sit-to-stand training with symmetrical foot position, while patients in the experimental group were given the modified sit-to-stand training in which the paretic foot placed posterior. Subjects in both groups received 30 minutes of sit-to-stand training, five times a week, for four weeks.

Main outcome measures:

The time and weight-bearing distribution during sit-to-stand movement, the centre of pressure sway length during quiet standing, the centre of pressure sway areas during dynamic standing and Berg Balance Scale were assessed before and after completing the four-week sit-to-stand training.

Results:

Our data showed significant improvements in standing balance and the sit-to-stand movement for two groups in the post-training compared with the pre-training. After training, the rise time shortened more significantly in the experimental group (mean change, 0.90 ±0.25 seconds) than the control group (mean change, 0.42 ±0.18 seconds). Weight-bearing asymmetry showed significantly greater improvement in the experimental group (mean change, 0.17 ±0.10) than in the control group (mean change, 0.06 ±0.05). Centre of pressure sway length was significantly smaller in the experimental group (mean change, 27.85 ±10.58 cm) than in the control group (mean change, 21.95 ±8.19 cm). Centre of pressure sway areas was significantly larger in the experimental group (mean change, 84.24 ±26.48 cm2) than in the control group (mean change, 67.74 ±22.84 cm2) (P = 0.027). The Berg Balance Scale was significantly higher in the experiment group (mean change, 8.4 ±3.1) than the control group (mean change, 5.8±2.8).

Conclusions:

A modified sit-to-stand training improves the balance function in hemiplegic stroke patients.

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