Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis: the Australasian experience

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Abstract

Objective

The aim of this project was to establish and maintain an internet-based database of all ileal pouch procedures performed in major centres in Australasia.

Method

The initial three colorectal units contributing data are Auckland, northern Brisbane and Central Sydney Area Health Service. A web-based database was designed. The data collection method was tested on a subgroup of 20 patients to ensure functionality. Data were collected in five main categories: patient demographics, preoperative data, operative details, postoperative complications and functional results.

Results

Initial data are presented for 516 patients [363 J, (70%), 133 W (26%), 16 S pouches (3%)]. There were two deaths within 30 days (0.4%). The anastomotic leak rate overall, in handsewn (HSA) and stapled anastomoses (SA) respectively was 5.0%, 8.5% and 3.3% (P = 0.02 for difference HSA vs SA). Incidence of pouchitis was 20% (ulcerative colitis 23%, Crohn's disease 20%, indeterminate colitis 22%, familial adenomatous polyposis 9%). Incidence of anal stricture requiring intervention (11% overall) was significantly greater in HSAs than in SAs (16%vs 9%, P = 0.02). Incidence of small bowel obstruction at any time postoperatively was 16%. Functional data were available for 234 patients. The median frequency of bowel actions during waking hours was significantly less in W pouches than in J pouches (four vs five, P = 0.0005).

Conclusion

A national web-based database has been developed for access by all Australasian colorectal units. Initial Australasian data compare favourably with other international studies. Pouchitis continues to be a long-term problem. The leak rate and rate of late anal stricture requiring a procedure are higher if the anastomosis is handsewn rather than stapled. Functional results are better with the W pouch than with the J pouch.

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