Long-term outcomes of locally or radically resected T1 colorectal cancer

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Abstract

Aim

Little is known about the long-term outcome of T1 colorectal cancer (CRC) following curative resection. The present study addressed the long-term outcome of locally or radically resected T1 CRCs.

Method

A total of 430 patients with T1 CRC who underwent local or radical resection were considered. Unfavourable histological factors were defined as positive resection margin, deep submucosal invasion, vascular invasion, Grade 3 and budding. The patients were classified as low-risk (unfavourable histological factor negative, n = 65) or high-risk (unfavourable histological factor positive, n = 365).

Results

Over a median follow-up of 78.4 months, disease recurred in 16 (3.7%) patients in the high-risk group, and no recurrence in the low-risk group. Resection type and vascular invasion were significantly associated with recurrence. In the vascular invasion (+) high-risk group, both 5-year disease-free survival rate and 5-year overall survival rate were significantly associated with resection type (radical 94.6%, local 43.8%, P < 0.001, and radical 99.1%, local 66.7%, P < 0.001). In the vascular invasion (−) high-risk group, 5-year disease-free survival rate was also significantly associated with resection type (radical 98.9%, local 84.7%, P = 0.001). However, 5-year overall survival rate was not associated with resection type (radical 98.9%, local 95.2%, P = 0.816).

Conclusion

Local resection may be effective and oncologically safe in low-risk T1 CRC. Although additional surgery should be recommended for the locally resected high-risk T1 CRC cases, intensive surveillance without additional surgery and timely salvage operation may offer another treatment option, if vascular invasion is negative.

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