Dry Eye Signs and Symptoms Persist During Systemic Neutralization of IL-1β by Canakinumab or IL-17A by Secukinumab

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Abstract

Purpose:

To evaluate whether inhibition of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β or IL-17A by canakinumab or secukinumab, respectively, influence the signs and symptoms of dry eye.

Methods:

In a randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled, outpatient clinical trial, 72 patients with moderate to severe dry eye were randomly assigned in a 1:1:1 ratio to treatment with a single intravenous dose of canakinumab, of secukinumab, or of placebo. Signs and symptoms of dry eye were evaluated on the treatment day and 1 week, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks after treatment. The prespecified primary efficacy endpoint was corneal staining in the study eye 4 weeks after treatment. Secondary endpoints included tear production (Schirmer test), tear film breakup time, conjunctival redness, the ocular surface disease index (OSDI), the frequency of a desire for a topical ocular lubricant, and visual acuity.

Results:

Of the 71 patients included in the analysis of safety, the rate of adverse events was similar between treatment groups. The course of corneal staining scores from baseline to 4 weeks, respectively, were for canakinumab 1.46 to 1.33 (P = 0.62 compared with placebo), for secukinumab 1.46 to 1.23 (P = 0.22), and for placebo 1.68 to 1.42. There were no changes in the other measures of efficacy beyond what was within the range expected for stochastic day-to-day variation.

Conclusions:

The results suggest that the inhibition of IL-1β or IL-17A obtained by systemic administration of neutralizing drugs does not influence the severity of dry eye.

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