The outcome of cancer patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome


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Abstract

Objective:The objective of the study is to determine the 28-day mortality of critically ill cancer patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).Design:This is a retrospective cohort study of patients enrolled in the ARDS Network randomized controlled trials.Results:A total of 2515 patients did not have cancer, and 116 patients had cancer. Patients with cancer were older (median, 61 vs 49 years; P < .0001), more critically ill (the median Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III score without cancer comorbidity was 105 for the cancer group compared with 87 for those without cancer; P < 0.0001), and more likely to have pneumonia or sepsis as cause of acute lung injury (79.31% vs 62.70%; P = .0011). The overall mortality at day 28 was 25.7%. Patients with cancer had significantly higher mortality (55.2%) compared with those without cancer (24.3%) (P < .0001). The odds ratio for mortality from ARDS at 28 days for cancer patients was 2.54 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.570-4.120). Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III score and age were found to be significant predictors of outcome in cancer patients with odds ratio of 1.034 (95% CI, 1.007-1.062; P = .0135) and 1.075 (95% CI, 1.024-1.129, P = .0036), respectively.Conclusions:Cancer patients with ARDS have a significantly higher risk of death compared with those without cancer. The increased risk appeared to be mediated by increased severity of illness at presentation, as well as by age.

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