Obstructive coronary artery disease in patients hospitalized for severe sepsis or septic shock with concomitant acute myocardial infarction


    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Purpose:It is difficult to differentiate type 1 acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with obstructive coronary artery disease (OCAD) from type 2 AMI in patients admitted for severe sepsis. The aims of this study were to assess the risk factors and prognosis of OCAD in patients admitted to the intensive care unit for severe sepsis with concomitant AMI.Materials and methods:This is a single-center retrospective cohort study including all consecutive patients who were hospitalized for severe sepsis or septic shock between March 2006 and September 2014 and who underwent coronary angiography in the intensive care unit to identify AMI.Results:Overall, 78 (5.5%) of 1418 patients hospitalized for severe sepsis underwent coronary angiography to identify concomitant AMI. Thirty-two patients (41%) had OCAD. Following multivariate analysis, the risk factors of OCAD were peripheral vascular disease (odds ratio [OR] = 5.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-30.4; P = .042) and at least 2 cardiovascular risk factors (OR = 6.7; 95% CI, 1.9-23.8; P = .003). Obstructive coronary artery disease was associated with a significant mortality increase at 60 days (OR = 8.1; 95% CI, 1.9-30.2; P = .004).Conclusions:Obstructive coronary artery disease is a poor prognosis factor in patients hospitalized for severe sepsis with concomitant AMI. In this setting, medical treatment should be considered for patients with peripheral vascular disease or with at least 2 cardiovascular risk factors; the need to perform coronary angiography should be considered carefully.

    loading  Loading Related Articles