Dysembryoplastic Neuroepithelial Tumor-Like Neoplasm of the Septum Pellucidum: A Lesion Often Misdiagnosed as Glioma: Report of 10 Cases


    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

The authors report a series of 10 low-grade neoplasms arising in the midline anteriorly in the region of the septum pellucidum with many of the histologic features of dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNT). The patients (five female, five male) ranged in age from 6 to 35 years (mean age, 21.5 years). The most common presenting symptoms were headache, nausea and vomiting, and visual disturbances. Radiographically, the tumors extended into the lateral ventricles from the septal region and obstructed the foramen of Monro. Varying degrees of hydrocephalus were present. The lesions were lobular, well-delineated, hypointense to brain on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. They were uniformly nonenhancing or showed only minimal peripheral enhancement. The tumors, in aggregate, had the histologic features of DNT. These included a mucin-rich background, oligodendrocyte-like cells, “floating neurons,” and a “specific glioneuronal element.” Seven patients underwent gross total resection and two underwent subtotal resection. No patients received adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy. On follow-up (n = 6; median, 14 months), all tumors had either not recurred or were radiologically stable. On the basis of both neuroimaging and histopathology, DNT-like lesions should be considered in the differential diagnosis of midline intraventricular tumors in children and young adults. Distinction from more aggressive neoplasms is essential because these tumors appear to behave in a benign fashion.

    loading  Loading Related Articles