OXYGEN TENSIONS AND OXYHEMOGLOBIN SATURATIONS IN THE ASSESSMENT OF PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE

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Abstract

We studied the theoretical basis for continuous monitoring of pulmonary gas exchange using arterial and mixed venous oximetry by examining the mathematical relationships between the calculated venous admixture (Qsp/Qt) and the ventilation-perfusion index, which is derived from oxyhemoglobin saturations. We compared this relationship with that between Qsp/Qt and its commonly used estimates: inspired oxygen concentration to arterial blood oxygen tension ratio, arterial to alveolar oxygen tension ratio, and alveolar-arterial oxygen tension difference.

The relationship between Qsp/Qt and the oxygen tension-based indices is nonlinear and substantially influenced by changes in inspired oxygen concentration and arteriovenous oxygen content difference. Therefore, it is inaccurate within the clinically acceptable range of arterial blood oxygenation. In contrast, calculation of ventilation-perfusion index from arterial and mixed venous blood oxyhemoglobin saturations provides a linear estimate of Qsp/Qt that is minimally affected by alterations in inspired oxygen concentration or oxygen uptake and, therefore, will allow accurate continuous assessment of pulmonary gas exchange.

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