Changing pattern of organ dysfunction in early human sepsis is related to mortality

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Abstract

Objective

We examined the pattern of organ system dysfunction, the evolution of this pattern over time, and the relationship of these features to mortality in patients who had sepsis syndrome.

Design

Prospective, multicenter, observational study.

Setting

Intensive care units in tertiary referral teaching hospitals.

Patients

A total of 287 patients who had sepsis syndrome were prospectively identified in intensive care units.

Materials and Measurements

Cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurologic, coagulation, renal, and hepatic dysfunction were assessed at onset and on day 3 of sepsis syndrome. Organ dysfunction was classified as normal, mild, moderate, severe, and extreme dysfunction. We calculated the occurrence rate and associated 30-day mortality rate of organ dysfunction at the onset of sepsis syndrome. We then measured the change in organ dysfunction from onset to day 3 of sepsis syndrome and determined, for individual organ systems, the associated 30-day mortality rate.

Results

At the onset of sepsis syndrome, clinically significant pulmonary dysfunction was the most common organ failure, but was not related to 30-day mortality. Clinically significant cardiovascular, neurologic, coagulation, renal, and hepatic dysfunction were less common at the onset of sepsis syndrome but were significantly associated with the 30-day mortality rate. Worsening neurologic, coagulation, and renal dysfunction from onset to day 3 of sepsis syndrome were associated with significantly higher 30-day mortality than with improvement or no change in organ dysfunction.

Conclusions

Increased mortality rate in sepsis syndrome is associated with a pattern characterized by failure of nonpulmonary organ systems and, in particular, worsening neurologic, coagulation, and renal dysfunction over the first 3 days. Although initial pulmonary dysfunction is common in patients with sepsis syndrome, it is not associated with an increased mortality rate.

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