Etomidate is associated with mortality and adrenal insufficiency in sepsis: A meta-analysis*

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Abstract

Objective:

To evaluate the effects of single-dose etomidate on the adrenal axis and mortality in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock.

Design:

A systematic review of randomized controlled trials and observational studies with meta-analysis.

Setting:

Literature search of EMBASE, Medline, Cochrane Database, and Evidence-Based Medical Reviews.

Subjects:

Sepsis patients who received etomidate for rapid sequence intubation.

Interventions:

None.

Measurements and Main Results:

We conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled trials and observational studies with meta-analysis assessing the effects of etomidate on adrenal insufficiency and all-cause mortality published between January 1950 and February 2012. We only examined studies including septic patients. All-cause mortality served as our primary end point, whereas the prevalence of adrenal insufficiency was our secondary end point. Adrenal insufficiency was determined using a cosyntropin stimulation test in all studies. We used a random effects model for analysis; heterogeneity was assessed with the I2 statistic. Publication bias was evaluated with Begg’s test. Five studies were identified that assessed mortality in those who received etomidate. A total of 865 subjects were included. Subjects who received etomidate were more likely to die (pooled relative risk 1.20; 95% confidence interval 1.02–1.42; Q statistic, 4.20; I2 statistic, 4.9%). Seven studies addressed the development of adrenal suppression associated with the administration of etomidate; 1,303 subjects were included. Etomidate administration increased the likelihood of developing adrenal insufficiency (pooled relative risk 1.33; 95% confidence interval 1.22–1.46; Q statistic, 10.7; I2 statistic, 43.9%).

Conclusions:

Administration of etomidate for rapid sequence intubation is associated with higher rates of adrenal insufficiency and mortality in patients with sepsis.

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