Effects of pneumoperitoneum and reverse Trendelenburg position on cardiopulmonary function in morbidly obese patients receiving laparoscopic gastric banding


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Abstract

SummaryWe prospectively evaluated the effects of pneumoperitoneum and reverse Trendelenburg position on cardiopulmonary function in 20 ASA physical status II-III morbidly obese patients (body mass index > 35 kg m−2) undergoing laparoscopic gastric banding. After general anaesthesia was induced, patients' lungs were ventilated using intermittent positive pressure ventilation (at measurement times, the following parameters were used: tidal volume 12 mL kg−1 ideal body weight, respiratory rate of 12 bpm, an inspiratory to expiratory time ratio of 1:2). Haemodynamic variables, blood gas parameters, and lung/chest compliance were recorded: in the supine position, after induction of general anaesthesia (T0, baseline) and induction of pneumoperitoneum (T1); after placing the patient in a 25° reverse Trendelenburg position (T2); during the surgical time (T3); before deflating the abdomen (T4); after pneumoperitoneum resolution (T5), and before the end of anaesthesia, with the patient supine (T6). The PaO2, PaO2/FiO2 ratio, and lung/chest compliance decreased during the study. After the pneumoperitoneum had been resolved, lung/chest compliance but not oxygenation parameters returned to baseline values. The arterial to end-tidal CO2 tension difference progressively increased from 0.38 ± 0.3 kPa (2.85 ± 2.25 mmHg) (T0) to 0.63 ± 0.3 kPa (4.73 ± 2.25 mmHg) (T6). In morbidly obese patients, undergoing laparoscopic gastric banding, a CO2 pneumoperitoneum markedly affected gas exchange and lung/chest compliance, while positioning the patient in a 25° reverse Trendelenburg position had no beneficial effects.

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