Soluble TREM-1 is not suitable for distinguishing between systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis survivors and nonsurvivors in the early stage of acute inflammation


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Abstract

Background and objectiveTo evaluate plasma levels of soluble TREM-1 (sTREM-1) in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), severe sepsis, and septic shock and to determine whether plasma sTREM-1 could be used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in sepsis in the surgical ICU.MethodsThe study was designed as an observational noninterventional clinical study in a surgical ICU of a university hospital. For this, 65 intensive care patients were enrolled within the first 24 h after onset of SIRS (n = 11), severe sepsis (n = 39) or septic shock (n = 15). In addition, 21 healthy volunteers served as controls. At days 0, 1, and 3 after diagnosis, plasma sTREM-1 was measured by ELISA.ResultsPlasma sTREM-1 concentrations in healthy controls did not significantly differ from those in patients with SIRS, severe sepsis, or septic shock at days 0, 1, and 3. Survivors were defined as septic patients surviving for at least 28 days. There were no differences in plasma sTREM-1 levels between survivors (n = 22) and nonsurvivors (n = 27) on any day.ConclusionsIn this study in patients with SIRS, severe sepsis, or septic shock, plasma sTREM-1 levels were not elevated as compared with healthy controls. Measurement of plasma sTREM-1 did not distinguish between patients with SIRS, severe sepsis, or septic shock or between survivors and nonsurvivors. The suggested role of sTREM-1 as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in sepsis should be carefully verified.

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