The Effect of Superior Placement of the Acetabular Component on the Rate of Loosening after Total Hip Arthroplasty.: Long-term Results in Patients Who Have Crowe Type-II Congenital Dysplasia of the Hip*

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Abstract

A method for measurement of the true acetabular region and the approximate femoral head center as well as a classification consisting of four zones for assessment of the acetabular position of the acetabular cup were used to analyze the results of primary total hip arthroplasty with cement in 117 patients (145 hips). All patients had Crowe type-II congenital dysplasia of the hip. The mean age at the time of the arthroplasty was fifty-one years (range, fifteen to seventy-six years), and the mean duration of follow-up was fourteen years (range, two to twenty-two years).

The initial position of the acetabular cup outside of the true acetabular region and outside of zone 1 (inferior and medial) was associated with an increase in the rates of loosening (p < 0.05) and revision (p < 0.04) of the femoral components. Cups that initially were more than fifteen millimeters superior to the approximate femoral head center, without lateral displacement, were associated with an increased rate of loosening (p < 0.001) and of revision (p < 0.04) of the femoral components as well as with an increased rate of loosening (p < 0.002) and of revision (p < 0.01) of the acetabular components.

These findings suggest that superior positioning of the acetabular component, even without lateral displacement, leads to increased rates of loosening of the femoral and acetabular components. An attempt should be made to position the acetabular component in or near the true acetabular region.

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