Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition and cerebral blood flow autoregulation in normotensive and hypertensive man


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Abstract

The acute effect on the lower limit of cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, captopril, was studied in normotensive volunteers and in hypertensive patients. Baseline CBF was measured using xenon-133 inhalation tomography, and changes in CBF were measured using the arterio-venous oxygen difference method. Cerebral blood flow autoregulation was studied in two separate normotensive groups, one group of 12 volunteers serving as a control, and one group of 12 volunteers studied after the administration of captopril 50 mg. In a group of seven hypertensive patients CBF autoregulation was studied before and 1 h after the administration of captopril 25 mg. In the normotensive volunteers the median lower limit of CBF autoregulation was 83 and 74mmHg in the untreated and the captopril-treated group, respectively, with no significant difference between the two groups. In five of the hypertensive patients the lower limit of CBF autoregulation was lowered by captopril, in median by 22mmHg. However, in two patients it was increased, by 3 and 13mmHg, respectively. It is proposed that the shift in the lower limit of CBF autoregulation seen in some of our cases, and which has previously been documented in experimental studies, may be dependent on the activity of the sympathetic nervous system.

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