Total Energy Expenditure and Patterns of Activity in 8-10-Year-Old Obese and Nonobese Children

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Summary

Total energy expenditure (TEE) and patterns of activity were measured by means of a heart rate (HR)-monitoring method in a group of 8-10-year-old children including 13 obese children (weight, 46 ± 10 kg; fat mass: 32 ± 9%) and 16 nonobese children (weight, 31 ± 5 kg; fat mass, 18 ± 5%). Time for sleeping was not statistically different in the two groups of children (596 ± 33 vs. 582 ± 43 min; p = NS). Obese children spent more time doing sedentary activities (400 ± 129 vs. 295 ± 127 min; p < 0.05) and less time in nonsedentary activities (449 ± 126 vs. 563 ± 135 min; p < 0.05) than nonobese children. Time spent in moderate or vigorous activity—i.e., time spent at a HR between 50% of the maximal O2 uptake (peak VO2) and 70% peak VO2 (moderate) and at a HR ≥70% peak VO2 (vigorous)—was not statistically different in obese and nonobese children (88 ± 69 vs. 52 ± 35 min and 20 ± 21 vs. 16 ± 13 min, respectively; p = NS). TEE was significantly higher in the obese group than in the nonobese group (9.46 ± 1.40 vs. 7.51 ± 1.67 MJ/day; p < 0.01). The energy expenditure for physical activity (plus thermogenesis) was significantly higher in the obese children (3.98 ± 1.30 vs. 2.94 ± 1.39 MJ/day; p < 0.05). The proportion of TEE daily devoted to physical activity (plus thermogenesis) was not significantly different in the two groups, as shown by the ratio between TEE and the postabsorptive metabolic rate (PMR): 1.72 ± 0.25 obese vs 1.61 ± 0.28 non-obese. In conclusion, in free-living conditions obese children have a higher TEE than do nonobese children, despite the greater time devoted to sedentary activities. The higher energy cost to perform weight-bearing activities as well as the higher absolute PMR of obese children help explain this apparent paradox.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles