FRACTURE OF THE HOOK OF THE HAMATE: A DIAGNOSIS EASILY MISSED


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Abstract

“If obstruction of the ulnar artery is suspected, the radial artery in each wrist is located by its pulsations; the examiner then places one thumb lightly over each radial artery and the index finger of each behind the patient's wrists and so each wrist is held lightly between the thumb and index finger. The patient elenches his hand in order to squeeze the blood out. The examiner compresses the radial arteries by pressure with his thumb. The patient quickly extends his fingers partially while compression of the radial arteries is maintained by the examiner. The return of color to the hand is noted. In cases where the arterial tree is intract, the pallor is replaced quickly by normal color or by reactionary color of a higher degree than normal, which gradually fades to normal color. If the ulnar artery is occluded, the pallor is maintained for a variable period, owing to the obstruction to arterial flow in the two main channels—this is a positive Allen's sign: when the radial artery is released, the color will return to the hand.‘’ (Allen EV, Barker NW, Hines EA Jr: Peripheral Vascular Surgery, third edition. Philadelphia. W. B. Saunders Co., 1962. p. 31–32.)

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