Pelvic Fractures in Pregnancy: Factors Influencing Maternal and Fetal Outcomes


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Abstract

Background The purpose of this study was to determine factors influencing maternal and fetal outcomes associated with pelvic fractures in pregnancy.Methods A literature review of pelvic and acetabular fractures during pregnancy was performed, providing 101 cases for analysis (1 case report was included). Factors influencing maternal and fetal mortality were evaluated.Results Pelvic and acetabular fractures during pregnancy were associated with a high maternal (9%) and a higher fetal (35%) mortality rate. Automobile-pedestrian collisions had a trend toward a higher maternal mortality rate, and vehicular collisions had a trend toward a higher fetal mortality rate, compared with falls. Injury severity influenced both maternal and fetal outcomes. Fracture classification (simple vs. complex), fracture type (acetabular vs. pelvic), the trimester of pregnancy, and the era of literature reviewed did not influence mortality rates. When considering potential causes of fetal death, direct trauma to the uterus, placenta, or fetus was not associated with a higher fetal mortality rate, compared with maternal hemorrhage. Pelvic and acetabular fracture surgery has rarely been reported in this patient population.Conclusion Pelvic and acetabular fractures in pregnancy continue to be associated with a high fetal mortality rate. Mechanism of injury and injury severity appeared to influence mortality rates, whereas the fracture classification, the fracture type, the trimester of pregnancy, and the era of literature reviewed did not.

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