The Prognostic Significance of a System for Classifying Mechanical Injuries of the Eye (Globe) in Open-Globe Injuries


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Abstract

Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic significance of a previously published system for classifying mechanical injuries of the eye (globe) in open-globe injuries.Methods The medical records of 150 patients with open-globe injuries identified from an established institutional database were retrospectively reviewed to classify all injuries at presentation by the four specific variables of the classification system: type of injury, defined by the mechanism of injury; grade of injury, defined by visual acuity in the injured eye at initial examination; pupil, defined as the presence or absence of a relative afferent pupillary defect in the injured eye; and zone of injury, defined by the location of the eye-wall opening. Final visual outcomes for these injuries were also recorded. Logistic regression models were used to analyze the data and to determine whether relationships existed between the specific classification variables and final visual acuity in the injured eyes.Results All four classification variables were significant predictors of visual outcome. When adjusted for the other variables, grade and pupil were the most significant predictors of final visual acuity.Conclusion This system for classifying mechanical injuries of the eye appears to be prognostic for visual outcomes in open-globe injuries. In particular, the measurement of visual acuity and testing for a relative afferent pupillary defect at the initial examination should be performed in all injured eyes because of their relative prognostic significance.

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