Pelvic Angiography for Recurrent Traumatic Pelvic Arterial Hemorrhage

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Background:

Angiography is the gold standard for the diagnosis and treatment of pelvic arterial hemorrhage associated with pelvic fractures. In most cases, a single angiogram with embolization is adequate to control pelvic arterial hemorrhage. However, a small subset of patients, require repeat pelvic angiogram to evaluate and treat recurrent hemorrhage. This study seeks to define this population and determine clinical predictors of recurrent hemorrhage.

Methods:

We conducted a retrospective case control study comparing patients with traumatic pelvic fracture undergoing repeated pelvic angiogram versus a single angiogram between the years 1995 and 2000. Stepwise logistic regression was used to identify the independent predictors of recurrent hemorrhage.

Results:

In the years studied, 556 patients underwent a pelvic angiogram to evaluate for pelvic arterial hemorrhage associated with pelvic fractures. Among these, 42 (7.5%) patients underwent a second angiogram for suspected recurrent hemorrhage. In comparison to the initial angiogram, the source of bleeding on the repeat angiogram occurred at a new bleeding site in 68%, at a previously embolized site in 18%, and both in 14%. Significant risk factors for recurrent pelvic arterial hemorrhage included hypotension or transfusion of >2 U of blood per hour before the initial angiogram, pubic symphysis widening, and more than two injured arteries requiring embolization (p < 0.05). Of these, more than two injured arteries requiring embolization (odds ratio, 16.0; 95% confidence interval, 2.9–88) and transfusion of >2 U of blood per hour (odds ratio, 6.9; 95% confidence interval,1.9–25) were independent predictors of recurrent hemorrhage.

Conclusion:

Angiographic control of traumatic pelvic arterial hemorrhage is highly successful. However, recurrent pelvic arterial hemorrhage does occur. We identified a subgroup of patients with pelvic fractures who are at increased risk of recurrent pelvic arterial hemorrhage and should be considered for early repeat angiography for signs of ongoing hemorrhage.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles