Health Values of Patients Coinfected With HIV/Hepatitis C: Are Two Viruses Worse Than One?


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Abstract

Objectives:We sought to assess health values of patients coinfected with HIV/hepatitis C (HCV) and compare them with those of patients singly infected with HIV or HCV and to characterize and assess the relationship of clinical and nonhealth-related factors with health values.Subjects:We studied a total of 203 subjects infected with HIV, HCV, or both.Measures:We assessed rating scale (RS), time tradeoff (TTO), and standard gamble (SG) values, and we explored associations of health values with the Mental Component Summary (MCS) and Physical Component Summary (PCS) of the SF-12; number of bothersome symptoms from the HIV Symptoms Index; spirituality, as assessed by the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy, Spiritual Well-being scale; as well as with a number of demographic, clinical, and psychosocial characteristics.Results:Of the 203 subjects, 59 (29%) had HIV monoinfection, 69 (34%) had HCV monoinfection, and 75 (37%) were coinfected. The mean (SD) health values for the cohort were: RS = 0.69 (0.23), TTO= 0.88 (0.24), and SG = 0.78 (0.30). Infection type was related, albeit differently, to TTO values (mean values for patients with coinfection = 0.82; HIV = 0.91; and HCV = 0.91 [P < 0.05]) and SG values (coinfection = 0.77; HIV = 0.70; and HCV = 0.87; P < 0.05). In multivariable models, RS scores were significantly associated with sexual orientation, PCS scores, MCS scores, symptoms, and spirituality (adjusted R2 = 0.61); TTO with symptoms and spirituality (adjusted R2 = 0.23); and SG with infection type, PCS scores, and symptoms (adjusted R2 = 0.24).Conclusions:Health values and their correlates varied by method of assessment. Health values appear to be driven more by symptoms, health status, and spirituality than by number of viral infections.

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