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Effect of Childhood Dysfunctional Voiding on Urinary Incontinence in Adult Women

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether a history of childhood dysfunctional voiding is associated with urinary incontinence in adulthood.

METHODS:

Using a case-control study, we surveyed patients presenting with or without urinary incontinence. Cases were patients referred to a tertiary urogynecology clinic, and controls were patients referred to a general gynecology clinic. Patients completed a validated childhood questionnaire about dysfunctional voiding. A total score of 6 or more in girls is indicative of dysfunctional voiding, a condition characterized by urgency, frequency, constipation, urinary or fecal incontinence, and/or urinary tract infections. Using an alpha of 0.05, a power of 80%, and a baseline prevalence of dysfunctional voiding of 8%, we determined that 170 patients were needed to show a 3-fold difference between groups.

RESULTS:

Cases (n = 84) and controls (n = 86) had similar baseline characteristics except for body mass index and incidence of previous pelvic surgery. Although the total dysfunctional voiding score was higher in cases than controls (7.3 versus 5.0, respectively; P = .001), the difference in the number (%) of patients with history of childhood dysfunctional voiding between the 2 groups was not significant (47 [56%] versus 36 [42%], respectively; odds ratio 1.76, 95% confidence interval 0.96–3.24; P = .07). When all patients from both groups were combined, there was a higher prevalence of a history of childhood dysfunctional voiding in women with or without current urinary frequency (P = .004), urgency (P = .03), stress incontinence (P = .01), and urge incontinence (P = .009).

CONCLUSION:

Women with adult lower urinary tract symptoms may have a higher prevalence of history of childhood dysfunctional voiding.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

II-2

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