The Effect of Octylglucoside and Sodium Cholate in Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Adhesion to Soft Contact Lenses


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Abstract

Purpose.In this study, the effect of the natural surfactants octylglucoside and sodium cholate in inhibiting Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion to conventional and silicone-hydrogel contact lenses (CL) was assessed. Hydrophobicity was also evaluated to conditioned and nonconditioned CL.Methods.The inhibiting effect of the tested surfactants was determined through “in vitro” adhesion studies to conditioned and nonconditioned CL followed by image acquisition and cell enumeration. Hydrophobicity was evaluated through contact angle measurements using the advancing type technique on air.Results.Sodium cholate exhibits a very low capability to inhibit microbial adhesion. Conversely, octylglucoside effectively inhibited microbial adhesion in both types of lenses. This surfactant exhibited an even greater performance than a multipurpose lens care solution used as control. Octylglucoside was the only tested surfactant able to lower the hydrophobicity of all CL, which can explain its high performance.Conclusions.The results obtained in this study point out the potential of octylglucoside as a conditioning agent to prevent microbial colonization.

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