FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH REDUCED VISUAL ACUITY DURING LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP OF PATIENTS WITH IDIOPATHIC CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY


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Abstract

PurposeTo investigate factors associated with reduced visual acuity during long-term follow-up of patients with idiopathic central serous chorioretinopathy (ICSC).MethodsRetrospective consecutive case series that included patients with ICSC who were younger than 50 years of age at the time of initial examination and were followed up for ≥3 years.ResultsThe mean follow-up for 101 involved eyes of 61 patients was 9.8 years (median, 8.0 years). Eyes were stratified into two groups based on visual acuity at the final examination: Group 1, visual acuity of 20/40 or better; and Group 2, visual acuity of worse than 20/40. Findings identified as potential risk factors for reduced vision at the final follow-up examinations for Group 1 versus Group 2 included the following: macular retinal pigment epithelium atrophy (90.8% versus 96.0%, respectively;P = 0.68); persistent pigment epithelial detachment or persistent subretinal fluid (5.3% versus 28.0%, respectively;P = 0.004); recurrences (39.5% versus 68.0%, respectively;P = 0.020); laser treatment (28.9% versus 32.0%, respectively;P = 0.80); and submacular choroidal neovascularization (0.0 versus 8.0%, respectively;P = 0.059).ConclusionsFactors associated with reduced visual acuity during long-term follow-up of patients with ICSC included persistent pigment epithelial detachment and/or subretinal fluid, recurrences, and submacular choroidal neovascularization.

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