ROLE OF INTRAVITREAL BEVACIZUMAB IN EALES DISEASE WITH DENSE VITREOUS HEMORRHAGE: A Prospective Randomized Control Study

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Purpose:

To investigate the role of intravitreal bevacizumab in Eales disease with dense vitreous hemorrhage.

Methods:

This is a prospective randomized control trial. Twenty eyes of 20 patients with dense vitreous hemorrhage because of Eales disease were randomly distributed in Group 1 (n = 10) and Group 2 (n = 10). Group 1 eyes received intravitreal injection of bevacizumab (1.25 mg/0.05 mL) every 4 weeks, and Group 2 eyes were observed. Patients of both groups were followed-up every 2 weeks. Vitrectomy was performed in case of nonresolving vitreous hemorrhage Grade 2 or more after 3 months of enrollment or immediately if retinal detachment was detected. Intraoperative difficulties while performing surgery and excessive bleeding were noted. The primary outcome measures were reduction in the grade of vitreous hemorrhage and the need for vitrectomy.

Results:

Only 1 eye from Group 1 and 2 eyes from Group 2 showed decrease in vitreous hemorrhage to Grade 2 (P = 0.531, 95% confidence interval). But all three eyes required vitrectomy because of persisting poor vision. Postoperative mean vision ± SD in Group 1 was 1.2 ± 0.57 in logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution units, and in Group 2, it was 0.78 ± 0.41 in logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution units (P = 0.086, 95% confidence interval). Three eyes (30%) in Group 1 had tractional retinal detachment after a single bevacizumab injection, while none of the Group 2 eyes had tractional retinal detachment (P = 0.060, 95% confidence interval). Vitrectomy was performed in all three eyes and had poor visual outcome after surgery. No intraoperative difficulties were noted in either group.

Conclusion:

Our study showed that repeated intravitreal bevacizumab in patients with Eales disease with dense vitreous hemorrhage may not hasten the resolution of vitreous hemorrhage or reduce the need for vitrectomy. Moreover, tractional retinal detachment may be a serious complication of therapy and hence should be closely monitored because it entails a poor visual prognosis.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles