COMPARISON OF DRUSEN AND MODIFYING GENES IN AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT RADIAL DRUSEN AND AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

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Abstract

Background:

Autosomal dominant radial drusen (ADRD), also termed Malattia Leventinese and Doyne honeycomb retinal dystrophy, causes early-onset vision loss because of mutation in EFEMP1. Drusen in an exceedingly rare ADRD human donor eye was compared with eyes affected with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This study also elucidated whether variations in high-risk AMD genotypes modify phenotypic severity of ADRD.

Methods:

Morphologic and histochemical analyses of drusen in one ADRD donor and seven AMD donors. Evaluation of complement factor H (CFH) and ARMS2/HTRA1 alleles in a cohort of 25 subjects with ADRD.

Results:

Autosomal dominant radial drusen had unique onion skin–like lamination but otherwise shared many compositional features with hard, nodular drusen and/or diffuse soft drusen with basal deposits. Autosomal dominant radial drusen also possessed collagen type IV, an extracellular matrix protein that is absent in age-related drusen. Antibodies directed against the membrane attack complex showed robust labeling of ADRD. Vitronectin and amyloid P were present in drusen of both types. High-risk alleles in the CFH and ARMS2/HTRA1 genes were not associated with increasing ADRD severity.

Conclusion:

Drusen from ADRD and AMD exhibit overlap of some major constituents, but ADRD exhibit distinct alterations in the extracellular matrix that are absent in AMD.

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