TYPE 2 NEOVASCULARIZATION SECONDARY TO AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION IMAGED BY OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY


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Abstract

Purpose:Optical coherence tomography angiography is a novel and noninvasive technique for imaging retinal microvasculature by detecting changes in reflectivity that is related to blood flow. The purpose of this study was to describe Type 2 neovascularization characteristics in age-related macular degeneration using optical coherence tomography angiography.Methods:Fourteen eyes of 14 consecutive patients with Type 2 neovascularization were prospectively included. All patients underwent a complete ophthalmological examination, including color and infrared fundus photography, fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography, spectral domain optical coherence tomography angiography, and optical coherence tomography angiography.Results:In all cases, Type 2 lesions could be detected by optical coherence tomography angiography, presenting as a hyperflow lesion in the outer retina, with a glomerulus (4/14) or medusa shape (10/14), surrounded by a dark halo. The superficial layer and the deep retina showed no abnormal flow. Surprisingly, the Type 2 lesions could also be observed in the presumed choriocapillaris layer. These glomerulus- or medusa-shaped lesions were connected, in 10/14 eyes, to a thicker main branch, which seemed to continue deep into the choroidal layers.Conclusion:Optical coherence tomography angiography may be a new imaging method for the diagnosis of Type 2 neovascularization in clinical routine. However, the specificity of the features needs to be investigated in further studies.

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