CHANGES IN VISUAL ACUITY AND PHOTORECEPTOR DENSITY USING ADAPTIVE OPTICS AFTER RETINAL DETACHMENT REPAIR

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Abstract

Purpose:

To quantify changes in photoreceptor density using adaptive optics fundus camera in patients after retinal detachment (RD) and to correlate them with macular involvement and best-corrected visual acuity.

Methods:

At 1 and 3 months (M1 and M3) after vitrectomy, 194 patients underwent adaptive optics imagery in both eyes, at 5 locations, that we matched between time points using anatomical landmarks. Twenty-two patients (10 fovea-OFF [OFF] and 12 fovea-ON [ON]) had matched and analyzable adaptive optics images. We used analysis of variance for repeated measures.

Results:

Best-corrected visual acuity (logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution and Snellen equivalent [SE]) was significantly different between OFF and ON RDs at baseline: 2.0 (2.3–0.95) (SE: 20/2000) versus 0 (0.1–0) (SE: 20/20); at M1: 0.35 (0.5–0.1) (SE: 20/40) versus 0.05 (0–0.1) (SE: 20/25); and at M3: 0.25 (0.3–0.1) (SE: 20/32) versus 0 (0–0) (SE: 20/20). We observed that cone density was stable in fellow eyes between M1 and M3 (P = 0.67); decreased in treated eyes than in fellow eyes (P < 0.05); and increased postoperatively in the ON group (P = 0.02) but not in the OFF group (P = 0.97). Visual acuity and RD type were independently correlated with cone density (P = 0.004, P = 0.000).

Conclusion:

Postoperative cone density was reduced in OFF RD, but also in the ON group, although the drop recovered during the 3-month follow-up. Cone density was significantly correlated with both visual acuity and type of RD at both time points.

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