OUTFLOW TRACT RECONSTRUCTION IN LIVING DONOR LIVER TRANSPLANTATION1

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Abstract

Background.

Hepatic venous reconstruction is critical in living donor liver transplantation because outflow obstruction may lead to graft dysfunction or loss. We describe our e-perience and analyze outcomes with a technique of creating a single outflow tract using venoplasties of the graft and recipient hepatic veins.

Patients and Methods.

A retrospective study was done on 38 consecutive living donor liver transplants performed from June 1994 to March 2000. The grafts included 36 left-side grafts and 2 right-side grafts. Nine grafts had multiple hepatic veins and required a venoplasty of two or three hepatic veins to create a single outflow orifice. Triple recipient hepatic venoplasty was performed in 32 patients, double venoplasty in 5 and none in 1.

Results.

There were four cases of outflow obstruction, three occurring in patients with a double recipient venoplasty. Two of the problems were remedied intraoperatively by adjusting the position of the graft although two were structural in nature and required the insertion of expandable metallic vascular stents. All donors and recipients with their original grafts are alive at a mean follow-up period of 27 months.

Conclusion.

A triple recipient venoplasty with a matching venoplasty of multiple graft hepatic veins to create a single wide outflow orifice is recommended in living donor liver transplantation using left side grafts.

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