Effects of scopolamine and ketamine on reconsolidation of morphine conditioned place preference in rats

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Abstract

Persistent memory associated with addictive drugs contributes to the relapse of drug abuse. The current study was conducted to examine the effects of scopolamine and ketamine on reconsolidation of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP). In experiment 1, after morphine CPP was acquired, rats were injected with ketamine (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) and scopolamine (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), respectively, after reexposure to an earlier morphine-paired context or in their home cages. The CPP was reassessed 24 and 48 h after reexposure. An additional group of rats received saline following reexposure to the earlier morphine-paired context. In experiment 2, two groups of rats were only given saline during the CPP training and subsequent administration of ketamine or scopolamine during the reexposure. In experiment 1, rats failed to exhibit morphine CPP when ketamine and scopolamine were administered only after reexposure to a morphine-paired context. CPP was not abolished by ketamine or scopolamine administration in the animals' home cages. Also, the animals receiving only saline injections showed strong morphine CPP 24 h after a short exposure to the morphine-paired context. In experiment 2, ketamine or scopolamine treatment alone did not induce CPP or aversion. Administration of scopolamine and ketamine, after reexposure to a drug-paired context, resulted in the disruption of morphine CPP, suggesting the potential effects of scopolamine and ketamine in disrupting memory associated with environmental cues and addictive drugs.

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