Cervical Laminoplasty: Use of a Novel Titanium Plate to Maintain Canal Expansion—Surgical Technique

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Abstract

Abstract:

Cervical laminoplasty is a technique used to achieve spinal cord decompression in cases of myelopathy or myeloradiculopathy. The most common reason for failure of this technique is restenosis due to hinge closure. Various techniques have been employed to hold the laminar “door” open while the body heals the lamina hinge in the new expanded position. Ideally, a method of achieving laminar fixation should be technically straightforward, provide secure laminar fixation, and be rapid to minimize the risk of iatrogenic injuries, blood loss, and operative time.

The authors describe the use of a novel plate designed to accomplish these goals. The technical issues relevant to performing the laminoplasty and securing the laminae are discussed. The plate has been proven biomechanically to be equal or superior to the currently used techniques. The use of this plate will allow the patient to engage in an early active rehabilitation protocol—while minimizing the risk of restenosis of the canal. This may ultimately lead to better preservation of motion and decreased axial neck pain following laminoplasty.

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