The Relation of Co-occurring Musculoskeletal Pain and Depressive Symptoms With Work Ability


    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Objective:To examine the relationship of musculoskeletal pain and depressive symptoms, occurring alone or both together, with self-rated current work ability and thoughts of early retirement.Methods:In a nationally representative sample drawn in 2000–2001, we studied actively working subjects aged 30 to 64 years (n = 4009).Results:Musculoskeletal pain was associated with moderate/poor physical work ability (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0 to 4.2) and mental work ability (OR = 1.6; 95% CI, 1.2 to 2.2). Depressive symptoms were associated with moderate/poor mental work ability only (adjusted OR = 4.2; 95% CI, 2.3 to 7.9). Moreover, only musculoskeletal pain was associated with thoughts of early retirement (OR = 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.8). There was an interaction between musculoskeletal pain and depressive symptoms regarding physical work ability and thoughts of early retirement.Conclusion:Co-occurrence of musculoskeletal pain and depressive symptoms is strongly related to poor self-rated physical work ability.

    loading  Loading Related Articles