Value of home blood pressures as predictor of target organ damage in mild arterial hypertension


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Abstract

BackgroundHome blood pressure measurement has gained increasing importance for the management of hypertensive patients. The aim of our study was to compare levels of clinic (CBP), ambulatory (ABP), and home blood pressure (HBP) measurements, and their relationships with various indexes of target organ damage in I–II grade essential hypertension.Design and methodsThirty-eight essential hypertensives underwent evaluation of clinic, ambulatory and home blood pressures. Each patient recorded HBP for 2 days with a digital BP monitor three times daily, the first time on the same day during which ABP monitoring was simultaneously performed. Moreover, in all subjects electrocardiogram recording, echocardiographic study, microalbuminuria assay and fundus oculi examination were obtained.ResultsThe average HBPs obtained on the first day, in particular systolic values, were quite similar to mean daytime ambulatory BP recorded on the same day. Clinic BP, both systolic and diastolic, showed no significant correlation with left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and with albumin excretion rate (AER), whereas a correlation barely significant was observed with an index of global target organ damage (GTODi), including cardiac, renal and retinal parameters. On the contrary, home blood pressures, especially those recorded on the second day, correlated significantly, and more tightly than clinic BP, with LVMI, AER and GTODi.ConclusionsOur study seems to justify the adoption of home BP monitoring in the management of hypertensive patients, as a useful complement to clinical readings, and may provide additional prognostic information.

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