EFFECTS OF A HEAVY AND A MODERATE RESISTANCE TRAINING ON FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE IN OLDER ADULTS

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Abstract

ABSTRACT

Resistance training can improve strength and functional performance, but there is little information about the effect of training intensity on functional performance in older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 12 weeks of heavy (80% of 1 repetition maximum [1RM]) and moderate (60% of 1RM) resistance training on functional performance in healthy, inactive older adults, ages 60–74 years. Volunteer subjects were assigned randomly to a control group (CS, n = 10), heavy resistance training group (HRT, n = 11), or moderate resistance training group (MRT, n = 12) and participated in 12 weeks of strength training, 3 times per week. Performance measurements included 1RM lower-body strength, chair-rising time, walking velocity, stair-climbing time, and flexibility. Significant differences between HRT and MRT were found for 1RM strength of the lower limbs after the training period. Functional performance improved similarly for both HRT and MRT after the training period. Functional performance can be improved significantly with either heavy or moderate resistance training, without significant differences in the effectiveness of the 2 training protocols.

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