Power Variables and Bilateral Force Differences During Unloaded and Loaded Squat Jumps in High Performance Alpine Ski Racers

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Abstract

Abstract

Patterson, C, Raschner, C, and Platzer, H-P. Power variables and bilateral force differences during unloaded and loaded squat jumps in high performance alpine ski racers. J Strength Cond Res 23(3): 779-787, 2009-The purpose of this paper was to investigate the power-load relationship and to compare power variables and bilateral force imbalances between sexes with squat jumps. Twenty men and 17 women, all members of the Austrian alpine ski team (junior and European Cup), performed unloaded and loaded (barbell loads equal to 25, 50, 75, and 100% body weight [BW]) squat jumps with free weights using a specially designed spotting system. Ground reaction force records from 2 force platforms were used to calculate relative average power (P), relative average power in the first 100 ms of the jump (P01), relative average power in the first 200 ms of the jump (P02), jump height, percentage of best jump height (%Jump), and maximal force difference between dominant and nondominant leg (Fmaxdiff). The men displayed significantly higher values at all loads for P and jump height (p < 0.05). No significant differences were found in P01. The men had significantly higher P02 at all loads except 75% BW). Maximum P was reached at light loads (men at 25% BW and women at 0% BW), and P decreased uniformly thereafter. Individual power-load curves show a deflection point. It is proposed that the load where the power-load deflection point occurs be used as the power training load and not the load at which maximum P is reached. It is also proposed that loads not be described in %1-repetition maximum (RM), but as %BW. This system can be used to safely assess and train power with loaded jumps and free weights.

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