Validity and Reliability of the Myotest Accelerometric System for the Assessment of Vertical Jump Height

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Abstract

Casartelli, N, Müller, R, and Maffiuletti, NA. Validity and reliability of the Myotest accelerometric system for the assessment of vertical jump height. J Strength Cond Res 24(11): 3186-3193, 2010-The aim of the present study was to verify the validity and reliability of the Myotest accelerometric system (Myotest SA, Sion, Switzerland) for the assessment of vertical jump height. Forty-four male basketball players (age range: 9-25 years) performed series of squat, countermovement and repeated jumps during 2 identical test sessions separated by 2-15 days. Flight height was simultaneously quantified with the Myotest system and validated photoelectric cells (Optojump). Two calculation methods were used to estimate the jump height from Myotest recordings: flight time (Myotest-T) and vertical takeoff velocity (Myotest-V). Concurrent validity was investigated comparing Myotest-T and Myotest-V to the criterion method (Optojump), and test-retest reliability was also examined. As regards validity, Myotest-T overestimated jumping height compared to Optojump (p < 0.001) with a systematic bias of approximately 7 cm, even though random errors were low (2.7 cm) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) where high (>0.98), that is, excellent validity. Myotest-V overestimated jumping height compared to Optojump (p < 0.001), with high random errors (>12 cm), high limits of agreement ratios (>36%), and low ICCs (<0.75), that is, poor validity. As regards reliability, Myotest-T showed high ICCs (range: 0.92-0.96), whereas Myotest-V showed low ICCs (range: 0.56-0.89), and high random errors (>9 cm). In conclusion, Myotest-T is a valid and reliable method for the assessment of vertical jump height, and its use is legitimate for field-based evaluations, whereas Myotest-V is neither valid nor reliable.

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