Relationship Between Measures of Balance and Strength in Middle-Aged Adults


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Abstract

Muehlbauer, T, Gollhofer, A, and Granacher, U. Relationship between measures of balance and strength in middle-aged adults. J Strength Cond Res 26(9): 2401–2407, 2012—The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between variables of static and dynamic postural control as well as between isometric and dynamic muscle strength. A single-group design was used. Thirty-two middle-aged healthy adults (mean age: 56 ± 4 years) performed measurements of static (unperturbed)/dynamic (perturbed) balance and of isometric (i.e., maximal isometric torque [MIT]; rate of torque development [RTD] of the plantar flexor)/dynamic (i.e., countermovement jump [CMJ] height and power) lower extremity muscle strength. No significant associations were observed between variables of static and dynamic postural control (r = +0.128–0.341, p > 0.05) and between measures of balance and strength (r = −0.189 to +0.316, p > 0.05). Significant positive correlations were detected between variables of isometric and dynamic strength ranging from r = +0.361 to +0.501 (p < 0.05). Further, simple regression analyses revealed that a 10% increase in the mean CMJ height (3.1 cm) was associated with 44.4 N·m and 118.4 N·m·s−1 better MIT and RTD, respectively. The nonsignificant correlations between static and dynamic balance measures and between balance and strength variables imply that static and dynamic postural control and balance and strength are independent of each other and may have to be tested and trained complementarily.

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