Clinical Relevance of Foam Rolling on Hip Extension Angle in a Functional Lunge Position


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Abstract

Bushell, JE, Dawson, SM, and Webster, MM. Clinical relevance of foam rolling on hip extension angle in a functional lunge position. J Strength Cond Res 29(9): 2397–2403, 2015—The objective of this study was to examine the duration of effectiveness of foam rolling on hip extension angles in a dynamic lunge position. Thirty-one subjects were assigned to control (n = 15) or intervention (n = 16) group. All the subjects followed the same testing timeline; 3 testing sessions, with 2 lunges in each session. The intervention group performed foam rolling between each lunge in sessions 1 and 2, and 5 times in 7 days between sessions 1 and 2. They did not foam roll during the week between sessions 2 and 3 or in session 3. The control group did not foam roll at all. Hip extension angles were recorded using Dartfish software and subjects filled out a global perceived effect scale rating the feeling of the second lunge and the intervention for each session. A 6 × 2 mixed-effects analysis of variance was run with post hoc t-tests revealing significant gains in hip extension within session 2 for the intervention group (p ≤ 0.05). Hip extension angles returned to baseline values after subject's ceased foam rolling for 1 week. Global perceived effect scores were higher for the intervention group and 29 of 32 words of descriptive feedback included positive words regarding foam rolling. We concluded that consistent foam rolling produced increases in hip extension during a dynamic lunge, but these effects are not seen within the first exposure. Foam rolling received positive reception and perceived improvements in hip extension. The findings indicate that repeated foam rolling is beneficial, both objectively and subjectively, for increasing range of motion immediately preceding a dynamic activity.

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