Validation of the Omron 705 IT oscillometric device for home blood pressure measurement in children and adolescents: The Arsakion School Study

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Abstract

Background

Limited evidence exists on the accuracy of oscillometric devices for blood pressure measurement in children. This study validated the Omron 705 IT monitor (Omron Healthcare Europe BV, Hoofddorp, The Netherlands) in normotensive children and adolescents.

Methods

Simultaneous blood pressure measurements were taken by two observers (connected mercury sphygmomanometers) four times, sequentially with three measurements by using the tested device. Absolute device–observer blood pressure differences were classified into three zones (within 5, 10 and 15 mmHg) and assessed using the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol criteria. The number of readings with a difference within 5 mmHg was calculated for each individual. The American Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation criterion (mean difference±SD <5±8 mmHg) was also applied.

Results

A total of 197 study participants (591 readings) were included (99 boys, mean age±SD 10.6±2.4 years (range 6–16 years). The device produced 378 (64%), 532 (90%) and 579 (98%) measurements within 5, 10 and 15 mmHg, respectively, for systolic blood pressure, and 415 (70%), 525 (89%) and 577 (98%) measurements, respectively, for diastolic blood pressure. In all, 136 study participants (69%) had at least two systolic blood pressure differences within 5 mmHg and 16 (8%) had no differences within 5 mmHg [for diastolic blood pressure 147 (75%) and nine (5%) participants, respectively]. Mean systolic blood pressure difference was 4.0±4.8 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure −2.1±5.9 mmHg and was <5±8 mmHg in quartiles of participants divided by age, height, body mass index, arm circumference, blood pressure or pulse rate.

Conclusions

The Omron 705 IT appears to be an accurate device for blood pressure measurement in normotensive children and adolescents.

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