History of Computer-assisted Orthopedic Surgery (CAOS) in Sports Medicine

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Computer-assisted orthopedic surgery and navigation applications have a history rooted in the desire to link imaging technology with real-time anatomic landmarks. Although applications are still evolving in the clinical and research setting, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery has already demonstrated in certain procedures its potential for improving the surgeon's accuracy, reproducibility (once past the learning curve), and in reducing outlier outcomes. It is also being used as an educational tool to assist less experienced surgeons in interpreting measurements and precision placements related to well defined anatomic landmarks. It also can assist experienced surgeons, in real-time, plan their bony cuts, tunnel placement, and with ligament balancing. Presently, the additional time, the expense to acquire the needed software and hardware, and restricted reimbursement have slowed the widespread use of navigation. Its current applications have been primarily in joint replacement surgery, spine surgery, and trauma. It has not been widely used in the clinical setting for sports medicine procedures. Sports medicine applications such as individualizing tunnel placement in ligament surgery, opening wedge osteotomy with and without accompanying ligament reconstruction, and balancing and tensioning of the ligaments during the procedure (allowing real-time corrections if necessary) are currently being evaluated and being used on a limited clinical basis.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles